Nov 23

WCSO Detectives Seize Drugs, Cash, More; 5 Arrested, Others Pending

 

WCSO Detectives Seize Drugs, Weapons and More; Five Arrested, Others Pending

The Wilson County Sheriff’s Office Narcotics Division have arrested five people (with charges pending against others) in an investigation that netted more than $300,00 in cash, 100 pounds of marijuana, large amounts of cocaine, pharmaceuticals, weapons, vehicles, recreational vehicles, and motorcycles. All are believed to be linked to a to an organized group of drug dealers.

“This was an outstanding job by our Narcotics Team in conjunction with Metro Nashville Police Drug and Gang Units and the 15th Judicial Drug Task Force,” said Sheriff Robert Bryan. “And as always, we thank the concerned, brave citizens willing to come forward to help rid our society of the menace the drug trade has produced. All of the meticulous attention to detail, hard work and long hours has truly paid off. We are so proud of everyone involved in this investigation.”

Narcotics detectives began investigating the illegal distribution of large quantities of marijuana in Lebanon in February, 2015. When they conducted a search on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5130 Linwood Rd in Lebanon, detectives recovered more than two pounds of marijuana and over $10,000 in cash and weapons. As a result, the Wilson County Grand Jury indicted Jeffrey Waylon Craddock, who resides at this residence. He has been arrested for violation of his parole and additional charges. Craddock has been and currently is incarcerated at the Wilson County Correctional facility in Lebanon.

While incarcerated at the facility, Craddock continued to actively participate in the distribution of marijuana in Wilson County. Upon further investigation, detectives discovered more evidence connected to Craddock’s arrest. It was determined the arrest was connected with several search warrants served in July 2015 in Wilson and Smith County. One search warrant executed at 4251 South Commerce Rd. in Watertown netted over 30 pounds of marijuana, and more than $20,000 in cash and weapons. Gary Neil VonStorch, Jr., who resides at the residence was arrested on charges stemming from the search and indicted by a Wilson County Grand Jury.

Another search warrant conducted in July 2015 at 320 B Trousdale Ferry Pike Lebanon, uncovered over $1,500 cash along with two pounds of marijuana and cocaine. Michael Mondrell Grooms, a resident of the address, was indicted by the Wilson County Grand Jury and arrested on numerous charges as a result.

In a joint effort with the 15th Judicial Drug Task Force, WCSO Narcotics deterctives executed a search warrant at 22 McGinnis Lane Brush Creek, where they uncovered more than five pounds of marijuana and over $20,000 in cash. Jason Lee Copeland was indicted by the Wilson County Grand Jury and arrested on charges stemming from the search of his residence.

Narcotics Detectives continued to develop leads and information pertaining to illegal trafficking involving this organized distribution. On Nov. 18, 2015, detectives conducted a traffic stop on Sparta Pike at Spring Creek Bridge in Lebanon and arrested David Alan (aka Bubba) Hankins for driving on a revoked Tennessee driver’s license. Upon searching the vehicle Hankins was driving, they recovered more than 48 pounds of marijuana and over $700 in cash. Based on information received through various sources, detectives believe David Hankins has taken over the distribution of marijuana while Jeffrey Craddock is incarcerated.

Further investigation after Hankins’ arrest, WCSO Narcotics detectives through a joint effort with Nashville Metro Vice and gang unit conducted a search warrant at 1441 Pleasant Hill Rd, Nashville. Narcotics Detectives believed based on confidential information that this was the location of the supplier of marijuana that was being distributed by the organization. They recovered over $200,000 in cash and weapons during the Nashville address search. Metro Nashville and WCSO Narcotics detectives continue their investigation into the residence along with its occupants.

Additional search warrants were executed at 7497 Trousdale Ferry Pike in Lebanon and at 36052 Old Nashville Highway in Alexandria, uncovering an undisclosed amount of cash and pharmaceuticals. No arrests has been made although a Grand Jury is being requested.

As a result of this investigation Detectives have seized and recovered over $300,00.00 in cash, 100 lbs of marijuana, cocaine, pharmaceuticals,  weapons, vehicles, recreational vehicles, and motorcycles. All obtained or uses in the distribution of illegal narcotics.

Arrested to date are:

*Jeffrey Waylon Craddock: charged with possession marijuana, conspiracy to possess marijuana, two counts of money laundering and two counts possession of firearms during the commission of a felony;

*Gary Neil VonStorch Jr: charged with possession of marijuana, two counts of conspiracy to possess marijuana, one county money laundering, and two counts of possession of firearms during the commission of a felony;

*Jason Lee Copeland: charged with possession of marijuana, two counts of conspiracy to possess marijuana and money launderin;

*Michael Mondrell Grooms: charged with possession of marijuana, two counts of conspiracy possess marijuana and money laundering;

*David Alan (aka Bubba Hankins): charged with driving on a revoked Tennessee driver’s license.

David Alan Hankins Jason Lee Copeland Jeffrey Craddock Michael Mondrell Grooms Neil VonStorch Jr.The investigation into David Alan Hankins’ involvement is ongoing. A Grand Jury investigation is being requested by WCSO Narcotics detectives though the District Attorney’s Office.

Nov 19

Reminder: Turkey Shoot Scheduled 9 a.m. Saturday to Help Paralyzed Deputy Court Officer

Reminder: Turkey Shoot Scheduled 9 a.m. Saturday to Help Paralyzed Deputy Court Officer

Wilson County Sheriff’s Office would like to remind everyone of a benefit turkey shoot to help a paralyzed WCSO deputy court officer. The event begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 21, at the Wilson County Fairgrounds at the James E. Ward Agricultural Center on Highway 70.

Deputy Earl Dyer has suffered a bilateral stroke as a result of a prior surgery. This stroke has paralyzed the 49-year-old court officer’s legs and left him with limited use of his arms, rendering him unable to work.

“We hope our community will come together to help this deputy who really wants to return to work,” Sheriff Robert Bryan said. “His prognosis remains guarded as to the likelihood that he will ever be able to walk again or regain total use of his arms.”

Deputy Dyer’s wife, Amy, due to her physical limitations, will have difficulty caring for him at home. The support of family, friends and community will have a direct impact on his well-being. The court officer has exhausted all county benefits and no longer has an income for the time being.

Rules for the Earl Dyer Benefit Turkey Shoot stipulate that each participant must use a stock shotgun. The stock shotguns allowed to be used in this benefit shoot include a 12, 20, 16 or 410 gauge shotgun. Each shot will cost $5. There will be a number of giveaways. All the money raised will be donated to the “Earl Dyer Fund” established at CedarStone Bank in Lebanon.

Anyone who would like to help through other measures may make a donation through an account at CedarStone Bank on West Main in Lebanon, TN in the name of “Earl Dyer Fund.” Contributions may also be dropped at the Criminal Justice Center (located adjacent the sheriff’s office located at 105 E. High Street) or the Judicial Center, 134 S. College St. More fundraisers will be announced in the near future including a Live Auction. A separate GoFundMe account is also set up at the following website: https://www.gofundme.com/earlamydyer.

Nov 13

Turkey Shoot, Live Auction Fundraisers Planned to Help Paralyzed Deputy Court Officer

Turkey Shoot, Live Auction Fundraisers Planned to Help Paralyzed Deputy Court Officer

Wilson County Sheriff’s Office has planned several ways to help raise much-needed funds for a paralyzed deputy court officer. Among the fundraisers planned are a turkey shoot scheduled to occur at 9 a.m. Nov. 21 and a Live Auction to be held at 6 p.m. Nov. 28.

Deputy Earl Dyer has suffered a bilateral stroke as a result of a prior surgery. This stroke has paralyzed the 49-year-old court officer’s legs and left him with limited use of his arms, rendering him unable to work.

“Although Deputy Dyer has always gone beyond the call of duty to help others, his prognosis remains guarded as to the likelihood that he will ever be able to walk again or regain total use of his arms,” Sheriff Robert Bryan said. “He faces many hurdles ahead in his life following this horrible, debilitating, and tragic event.”

Deputy Dyer’s wife, Amy, due to her physical limitations, will have difficulty caring for him at home. The support of family, friends and community will have a direct impact on his well-being. On Nov. 18, 2015, the very active court officer will no longer have an income. He will have exhausted all county benefits.

The upcoming Earl Dyer Benefit Turkey Shoot is scheduled to be held at the WCSO firing range located at Wilson County Fairgrounds at James E. Ward Agricultural Center on Highway 70. It will begin at 9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 21. Each participant must use a stock shotgun. The stock shotguns allowed to be used in this benefit shoot include a 12, 20, 16 or 410 shotgun. Each shot will cost $5. There will be a number of giveaways. All the money raised will be donated to the “Earl Dyer Fund” established at CedarStone Bank in Lebanon.

Meanwhile, those who would like to help are encouraged to make donations through an account at CedarStone Bank on West Main in Lebanon, TN in the name of “Earl Dyer Fund.” Contributions may also be dropped at the Criminal Justice Center (located adjacent the sheriff’s office located at 105 E. High Street) or the Judicial Center, 134 S. College St. WCSO will update everyone on the WCSO’s progress as we prepare for this long, arduous journey for the Dyers Sheriff Bryan noted.

You may also make contributions to a separate GoFundMe account at this website: https://www.gofundme.com/earlamydyer

The Sheriff’s Office is also asking anyone who would like to donate items for the Earl Dyer Live Auction to please contact our office. The Live Auction will be held at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 28 at the Turner Evans Building at the James E. Ward Agricultural Center. The WCSO is currently in need of donated items to auction. Other fundraisers will be announced in the near future.

“As a family in law enforcement and a community, we hope to spread support far and wide for Earl and his wife,” Sheriff Bryan said. “There are so many people in need in our community and across the county, especially in this line of work. Deputy Earl has always been generous person and would go out of his way to help anyone else. He wants to return to work but he needs our help now. Let us all stand together in this effort.”

 

Nov 05

WCSO Sets up Account to Help Paralyzed Deputy Court Officer

WCSO Sets up Account to Help Paralyzed Deputy Court Officer

Wilson County Sheriff’s Deputy Earl Dyer has suffered a bilateral stroke as a result of a prior surgery. This stroke has paralyzed the 49-year-old court officer’s arms and legs, rendering him unable to work.

Although Deputy Dyer always went out of his way to help others, his prognosis remains guarded as to the likelihood that he will ever be able to walk again or regain use of his arms,” Sheriff Robert Bryan said. “He faces many hurdles ahead in his life following this horrible, debilitating, and tragic event.”

Deputy Dyer’s wife, Amy, due to her physical limitations, will have difficulty caring for him at home. The support of family, friends and community will have a direct impact on his well-being. On Nov. 18, 2015, the very active court officer will no longer have an income. He will have exhausted all county benefits.

“If you know Earl, he never meets a stranger,” said Sgt. Don Witherspoon, with whom he was first assigned after coming to work at the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office. “He’s always got a smile on his face, and talks to everyone. He’s always been so independent. This is a man who hates asking for anything, but he needs our help.”

The WCSO is planning a number of fundraisers in the very near future, and the Sheriff’s Office will be circulating news of the events soon. Meanwhile, those who would like to help are encouraged to make donations through an account at CedarStone Bank on West Main in Lebanon, TN in the name of “Earl Dyer Fund.” Contributions may also be dropped at the Criminal Justice Center (located adjacent the sheriff’s office located at 105 E. High Street) or the Judicial Center, 134 S. College St. We will update everyone on the WCSO’s progress as we prepare for this long, arduous journey for the Dyers.

You may also make contributions to a separate GoFundMe account at this website: https://www.gofundme.com/earlamydyer

“As a family in law enforcement and a community, we hope to spread support far and wide for Earl and his wife,” Sheriff Bryan said. “There are so many people in need across the county and the entire country, especially in this line of work, but I guarantee you, this is a man who has always been generous and would go out of his way to help anyone else. He needs our help now. Let us all stand together in this effort.”

 

Oct 02

Lebanon, Wilson County Communities to mark Night Out Against Crime October 6

Lebanon, Wilson County Communities to mark Night Out Against Crime October 6

Citizens, law enforcement, fire and safety officials will come together for an evening of free entertainment, food, fun and unity against crime from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday, October 6 throughout Wilson County.

The annual Night Out Against Crime serves as an opportunity for law enforcement and other emergency service workers to get to know the community in a fun-filled atmosphere. “One of the most important resources we have is a good relationship with the citizens of our community,” said Wilson County Sheriff Robert Bryan. “They are our most effective weapon against crime. In addition, this is a fun-filled way for citizens to get to know all of the emergency personnel that are working together to keep everyone safe throughout Wilson County.”

The free event (which is normally held in thousands of cities across the country in August) will feature a variety of educational events, entertainment and activities for all ages, refreshments and demonstrations of equipment by the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office, Lebanon Police and Fire, WEMA and Lebanon Public Safety. Most of the events will occur at the Don Fox Community Park located at 955 W. Baddour Parkway in Lebanon. However, other events will take place in the following areas: Poplar Ridge/Southwinds (S. Mt. Juliet Road and Dell Drive); Oakwood Terrace (Eastwood Place and Tall Oak Trail); Wright Farms (Stockbridge Way and Harrisburg Lane); and Driftwood Acres.

Some of the evening highlights will include a costume contest for children 12 and under a children’s bounce house; a cake decorating contest for all ages; Live K9 demonstrations; vehicle displays and mascot appearances. The community can take part in exploring the command center bus, Humvee, jail van, explosive ordinance disposal, mine resistant assault vehicle, safety patrol boat and other emergency transportation vehicles.

Other educational opportunities available are booths to learn about fingerprinting, the Wilson County Citizens’ Academy, DUI testing facilities; the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office SCAN program designed to help care for senior citizens and other booths showcasing the popular search and rescue dogs.

“In this day and age with so much strife between law enforcement and communities in some parts of the country, it’s nice to see our citizens coming together to learn and have a good time,” Sheriff Bryan added. “This is an event we look forward to each year, and I hope everyone will take the opportunity to at least stop by for even a few minutes.”

 

Sep 24

REMINDER: WCSO Hosting Drug Take Back Day Sept. 26 at Sheriff’s Office

got drugs

Wilson County Sheriff Robert Bryan wants to remind the public the Office will be hosting a Drug Take Back Saturday, Sept. 26, for anyone wanting to dispose of unwanted and/or expired prescription and non-prescription drugs.. The event to be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the WCSO Office at 105 East High Street in Lebanon is in conjunction with the DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) National Take Back Initiative. A bin will be set up in the WCSO lobby area to drop off medications. No questions will be asked.

 

“It’s important to properly dispose of any prescription drugs you are not longer taking or are expired,” Sheriff Robert Bryan said. “The medicine cabinet is many times the first place young people look to begin experimenting with drugs. Unfortunately, many of us know all too well this can lead to addiction and overdoses, often involving our loved ones.”

 

State officials recently noted that death by drug overdoses was one of the leading causes of death in Tennessee. In Wilson County, there were a total of 1,061 deaths in 2014 with drug overdoses (26) surpassing all deaths involving the discharge of firearms (17) and motor vehicle accidents, totaling 14.

 

“It’s important to keep track of what kind of medications you have and how many tablets, pills, etc. you have used,” the sheriff said. “Just as you keep dangerous products out of reach of children, you may even consider keeping your medications in a locked cabinet. This is especially true if you have young people in the house who you may have never even suspected might try a medication you’re taking.”

 

DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take-Back events provide an obviously needed and valued service to the public, while also reducing prescription drug abuse and trafficking, the sheriff said. “By taking these medications with no questions asked, the DEA is helping make Wilson County a safer place. We appreciate cooperative agency efforts such as this one to enable the public to regularly, safely, and conveniently dispose of such medicines when they are no longer needed or wanted.”

 

Sep 22

LSSD Board Awards Wilson Co SRO Bowen for Saving Life

LSSD Board Award Wilson Co SRO Bowen for Saving Life

Wilson County Sheriff’s Office Special Resources Officer (SRO) Joe Bowen was presented a Meritorious Citation Monday evening by the Lebanon Special School District Board for recently saving the life of a young girl.

LSSD Student Services Administrator Mike Kurtz, who was also once an SRO at Lebanon High School, handed the officer the award for his “outstanding performance” in his quick reaction when he noticed a child in distress at a parent-teacher conference on Sept. 5. Bowen, who is normally an SRO at West Elementary happened to be filling in for another officer at Byars Dowdy Elementary for the conference, noticed the child was apparently choking on a piece of candy. The school nurse was off-duty at the time of the meeting. Bowen immediately sprang into action, performing the Heimlich Maneuver on the girl, dislodging the candy and ultimately saving the girl’s life.

“Because of his dedication to his duty, he was quick to react and save the child,” Kurtz said during the presentation. “Officer Bowen has a positive attitude and extreme dedication to his job. He did exactly what he was trained to do. This is why we have SROs in our schools.”

This year is Officer Bowen’s first year as an SRO although he has been with the Sheriff’s Office for 11 years. Ironically, LSSD School Administrator Kurtz was Bowen’s SRO at Lebanon High School when he was a student.

“When I saw what was happening,” Bowen said, “I knew I had to do something and that’s where my training came into play.”

Although the father was present, he speaks only limited English but was able to express his appreciation to Officer Bowen as did the child whose life he saved. The SRO said he was “very grateful for the award,” adding, “This award was not anything I was expecting. Just knowing the girl was ok was enough of an award for me.”

Sheriff Robert Bryan said he was extremely proud of Officer Bowen. “He is a true asset to our office and the community. We are fortunate to have him and all the other dedicated SROs in every school in the county.” Bowen is married to Mandy Bowen, who is a school nurse at West Elementary. They have two children, Connor, 11, and Jackson, who is seven.

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Sep 14

WCSO Lt. Harrison Receives TN DSHS Award

IMG_6236

WCSO Lt. Bob Harrison Receives TN Homeland Security Special First Responders Award

Wilson County Sheriff’s Lt. Bob Harrison has been awarded the prestigious “Three Stars of Tennessee” First Responders Award from the TN Department of Safety and Homeland Security for recognition of his outstanding service to the State during his long tenure in law enforcement.

Lt. Harrison, a 35-year law enforcement officer in various roles, was one of only six receiving the “Three Stars of Tennessee” Award to recognize first responders in emergency service, law enforcement and firefighters who have lost their lives or suffered a career-ending injury in the line of duty.”

Lt. Harrison, who is currently on leave while fighting two types of cancer, is also one of 20 First Responders recognized during the event held at the Conservation Hall at the Executive Residence in Nashville. Each year since the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the TN DSHS recognizes those who have dedicated their lives for the safety and security of Tennesseans.

Wilson County Sheriff Robert Bryan nominated Lt. Harrison because of his outstanding service with the Sheriff’s Office, where he has been awarded the Medal of Valor twice, in 2003 and 2008, for affecting over 1,000 arrests in a single year. The sheriff noted that Harrison has also received letters of commendation from numerous agencies, including the Kentucky State Police, the North Carolina General Court of Justice Fifth Prosecutorial District, the U.S. Marshal’s Service, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the TBI and local law enforcement agencies across Middle Tennessee.

Lt. Harrison was one of the first Terrorism Liaison Officers trained in Tennessee after 9/11. “Bob has been committed to the safety of the citizens of Wilson County, the State of Tennessee and thousands of others who travel through Wilson County on a daily basis,” Sheriff Bryan said of Lt. Harrison. “He has shown a very strong work ethic and willingness to take action as necessary to fulfill his responsibilities by arresting 12,085 people wanted on criminal charges since his employment at Wilson County.”

Sheriff Bryan further noted, “Many of these people (Lt. Harrison arrested) have long histories of criminal activities and violence. In doing so, he put his own life at risk in many dangerous situations.”

The awards, whose legislation for the “Three Stars of Tennessee Award” was sponsored by TN Sen. Becky Duncan Massey in 2014, were presented by Massey, Jim Henry, deputy to Gov. Bill Haslam, and DSHS Commissioner Bill Gibbons.

“Today is a special day in Tennessee as we recognize the men and women who risked and gave their lives as public safety professionals,” Commissioner Gibbons said at the presentation. “Our hearts go out to the families who have lost loved ones in the line of duty. We are grateful for their service and honor their memories today.”

Lt. Harrison’s career includes being a Special Agent (toxicologist) with the TBI, a forensic chemist with the Broward County Sheriff’s Office in Florida; a detective with the Lebanon Police Department and currently as Lieutenant and supervisor in the Criminal Warrant Division of the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office.

 

Sep 08

WCSO K-9 Team Take Top State Awards

Sgt Robin Curtis and Rocky K-9 TeamWilson County Sheriff’s Sgt. Robin Curtis and his K-9 partner Rocky took home some top honors during this week’s annual Region 13 PD-1 Trials, competing with 28 other dogs across the region.

Sgt. Curtis and Rocky took first place in Criminal Apprehension, third place in Obedience and for the second time won the coveted Jimmy D. Anderson Memorial award for the highest combined scores in apprehension and obedience. Sgt Curtis and Rocky won the Jimmy D. Anderson award in 2012 after winning 2nd overall, 1st in Criminal Apprehension and 2nd in Obedience. In 2011 Sgt Curtis and Rocky also won 2nd in Criminal Apprehension.

“Rocky has a unbelievable desire to please with a huge drive to work,” said Sgt Curtis of his partner with whom he has been work since 2009. “It’s been a great pleasure to work with a partner like Rocky. He’s a one of a kind dog.”

Sgt. Curtis said Rocky has had four criminal apprehensions on the street over the years in Wilson County and helping other agencies nearby. He has detected “well over a million dollars worth” of narcotics and currency, Sgt. Curtis said.

“This Office is extremely lucky and we are proud to have such a talented team,” Sheriff Robert Bryan said. “Those who benefit the most are the people of Wilson County who can be assured they have a superior K-9 partnership working for them.”
Rocky, an eight-year-old Belgian Malinois, will continue to work “as long as he is healthy and able,” the K-9 Officer said. “After he retires, I probably won’t get another partner. I really can’t see myself working another K-9 after being with such an exceptional dog for so long.
Rocky was raised and trained by Dean Hunter, Owner of Canine Command in Hendersonville, TN. Dean trains K-9 dogs for Hendersonville, Springfield and Gallatin Police Departments in addition to others.

Sep 02

WCSO Hosting Drug Take Back Day Sept. 26 at Sheriff’s Office

The Wilson County Sheriff’s Office will be hosting a Drug Take Back Saturday, Sept. 26, for anyone wanting to dispose of unwanted and/or expired prescription and non-prescription drugs. No questions will be asked. The event to be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the WCSO Office at 105 East High Street in Lebanon is in conjunction with the DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) National Take Back Initiative.

“It’s important to properly dispose of any prescription drugs you are not longer taking or are expired,” Sheriff Robert Bryan said. “The medicine cabinet is many times the first place young people look to begin experimenting with drugs. Unfortunately, many of us know all too well this can lead to addiction and overdoses, often involving our loved ones.”

The Tennessee Department of Health Commissioner John Dreyzehner noted in a recent report that drug overdoses in the state surpassed the number of people killed by motor vehicle accidents and even firearms discharges and blood pressure and kidney diseases in 2014. The number of drug overdoses has been escalating statewide for several years.

In Wilson County, there were a total of 1,061 deaths in 2014 with drug overdoses (26) topping that caused by all deaths involving the discharge of firearms (17) and motor vehicle accidents, totaling 14.

Sheriff Bryan encouraged people to begin now looking through their medications for any they are no longer taking or are expired in preparation for the Drug Take Back Day. “It’s important to keep track of what kind of medications you have and how many tablets, pills, etc. you have used,” the sheriff said. “Just as you keep dangerous products out of reach of children, you may even consider keeping your medications in a locked cabinet. This is especially true if you have young people in the house who you may have never even suspected might try a medication you’re taking.”

Medications you use for legitimate reasons are often subject to theft, and can lead to addition and ultimately even drug trafficking. Sheriff Bryan noted that there is a national epidemic of prescription drug abuse that is often the motive in numerous crimes. “We’ve seen pharmacy robberies and even murders increasing at an alarming rate because of drug addiction across this state and the entire country,” he noted, “and it often begins with a young person taking a few pills from someone’s medicine cabinet.”

DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take-Back events provide an obviously needed and valued service to the public, while also reducing prescription drug abuse and trafficking, the sheriff said. “By taking these medications with no questions asked, the DEA is helping make Wilson County a safer place. We appreciate cooperative agency efforts such as this one to enable the public to regularly, safely, and conveniently dispose of such medicines when they are no longer needed or wanted.”