23 Attend WCSO Citizens’ Academy

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 Estimated 23 Attend Wilson County Sheriff’s Citizens’ Academy 

Some 23 people are about to discover what it’s like being inside or operating a jail, trying to decide whether to shoot or safely disarm a criminal suspect, how to be a dispatcher and find out what it’s like to work for the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office.

Wilson County Sheriff Robert Bryan welcomed the group along with Sgt. James Lanier, who will be conducting the Sheriff’s Citizens’ Academy, which is a 10-week course that meets from 6-9 p.m. every Tuesday at the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office located at 105 E. High St., Lebanon, TN.  

The Sheriff, Sgt. Lanier and several other presenters gave class members an overview of what they can expect to learn over the next few months. Some of the classes include discussions of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, domestic violence, patrol procedures, Schools Resource Officers, Civil and Criminal Warrants, DUI awareness, police K-9 demonstrations, handcuffing procedures and other law enforcement functions. The course also includes hands-on activities, field trips such as a three-hour jail tour, a visit to the firing range, lectures by Communications dispatchers, a representative from the District Attorney’s Office, demonstrations in boating safety and the Office’s Special Response Team among other activities. 

“We are pleased this many people are interested in learning about the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office and what this department does for Wilson County,” Sheriff Robert Bryan said. “We hope they will enjoy the classes and presenters who have worked hard to show what the Officers do, why and how they go about their jobs.”  

Although all participants must pass a background check, there are no minimum physical requirements, just a desire to learn more about law enforcement and get exposure to day-to-day aspects of the many facets involved in enforcing the law and assisting fellow citizens.   

“This class helps to foster a better understanding between the citizens and the Sheriff’s Office,” said Wilson County Sheriff’s Sgt. James Lanier. “It familiarizes the citizens with how the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office operates. This course shows how different the Sheriff’s Office is from the other law enforcement offices in Wilson County, how much more responsibility the Office has compared to other agencies.” 

“The Citizen’s Sheriff’s Academy provides a unique interactive look at the scope of our county’s law enforcement,” said Sam Shallenberger, a graduate of the Citizen’s Sheriff’s Academy and President of the Academy’s Alumni Association. “I came away from the experience with the impression that the Sheriff’s Office is like an iceberg, with only a portion visible to the general public.  Sgt. Lanier established the Alumni Association so that graduates can continue to contribute and support the ongoing citizen education the academy offers.”  

Sheriff  Bryan started the Sheriff’s Citizens Academy three years ago to offer the community and business people a voluntary opportunity to get a better understanding of and full exposure to the Sheriff’s Office.  

 

 

Feb 24

WCSO Citizens’ Academy Applications Due Feb. 27

Sheriff's Citizens' Academy 2014 classes

Sheriff’s Citizens’ Academy 2014 classes

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Reminder: Wilson County Sheriff’s Office Citizens’ Academy Applications Due Soon

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like being inside or operating a jail, trying to decide whether to shoot or safely disarm a criminal suspect, how to be a dispatcher or just wanted to find out what it’s like to work for the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office, the Sheriff’s Citizens’ Academy is the place for you. The WCSO will be taking applications through Feb. 27 if you are interested in getting into a hands-on class.

Applications are currently being accepted for the 10-week course that meets from 6-9 p.m. every Tuesday at the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office located at 105 E. High St., Lebanon, TN. All applicants must pass a background check in order attend.

There are no minimum physical requirements, just a desire to learn more about law enforcement and get exposure to day-to-day aspects of the many facets involved in enforcing the law and assisting fellow citizens.

“This class helps to foster a better understanding between the citizens and the Sheriff’s Office,” said Wilson County Sheriff’s Sgt. James Lanier. “It familiarizes the citizens with how the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office operates. This course shows how different the Sheriff’s Office is from the other law enforcement offices in Wilson County, how much more responsibility the Office has compared to other agencies.”

Some of the classes include topics such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, domestic violence, patrol procedures, Schools Resource Officers, Civil and Criminal Warrants, DUI awareness, handcuffing procedures and other law enforcement functions. The course also includes hands-on activities, field trips such as a three-hour jail tour, a visit to the firing range, lectures by Communications dispatchers, a representative from the District Attorney’s Office, demonstrations in boating safety and the Office’s Special Response Team among other activities.

“The Citizen’s Sheriff’s Academy provides a unique interactive look at the scope of our county’s law enforcement,” said Sam Shallenberger, a graduate of the Citizen’s Sheriff’s Academy and President of the Academy’s Alumni Association. “I came away from the experience with the impression that the Sheriff’s Office is like an iceberg, with only a portion visible to the general public.  Sgt. Lanier established the Alumni Association so that graduates can continue to contribute and support the ongoing citizen education the academy offers.”

Sheriff Robert Bryan started the Sheriff’s Citizens Academy three years ago to offer the community and business people a voluntary opportunity to get a better understanding of and full exposure to the Sheriff’s Office. The upcoming fourth class is limited to 25 citizens. To apply, contact Elizabeth Anderson at wcso95.org or call at 615-444-1412, ext. 255.

 

 

Feb 05

WCSO Arrest Two for Alleged Meth Sales, Manufacturing

Wilson County Sheriff’s Office Arrest Two for Alleged Meth Sales, Manufacturing Two Carthage residents have been arrested and are being held at the Wilson County Correction Facility for allegedly making and selling methamphetamines. A concerned citizen notified Wilson County Deputy Matt Bush of suspicious activity surrounding two individuals sitting in a 2000 Nissan Frontier truck sitting in a field off the roadway in the 9000 block of Bluebird Road in Lebanon on Jan. 30. Upon responding to the information, Deputy Bush saw a man and woman sitting in the car matching the description the citizen reported. The driver of the vehicle was identified as Richard Scott Stewart, 44, of 115 Hilltop Dr., Carthage, Tennessee. His passenger was 32-year-old Desarae  Starlett Arnold of 121 Langford Dr. Carthage, Tennessee. Upon further investigation, Deputy Bush spotted numerous items inside the bed of the truck, including  chemicals, drugs, drug ingredients, and apparatus that are consistent with the manufacturing and promotion of methamphetamine. Inside the cab of the truck, Deputy Bush saw the pair with methamphetamine, drug paraphernalia to include scales, smoke pipe baggies, and syringes. Deputy Bush immediately summoned Wilson County Deputy Jason Anderson, a certified Clandestine Lab Technician to the scene. Deputy Anderson determined that a methamphetamine cook had recently occurred and there was potential for a future meth cook based on the items located within the truck. Deputy Anderson cleared the scene of all harmful chemicals and items that could cause harm to the public, along with protecting the environment from exposure that could affect livestock and other wildlife within the area.   Wilson County Sheriff’s Office obtained warrants and arrested the pair for promotion of methamphetamine, possession of Schedule II methamphetamine for resale, and drug paraphernalia.   “The methamphetamine situation in Wilson County continues to escalate,” Sheriff Robert Bryan said. “I have taken substantial steps to deter this rising problem. We are fortunate to have a part-time training officer who was previously assigned to the DEA and has vast knowledge related to methamphetamine.”   Sheriff Bryan described the training officer, who asked not to be identified, as “doing a tremendous job with educating our deputies on the hazards of methamphetamine and how it affects our community.”   “This is apparent by the observations and actions both Deputy’s Bush and Anderson took in resolving this current situation to prevent any further exposure to the community. We have a specific ongoing process here at the Sheriff’s Office where we are in the process of training additional clandestine lab technicians in an effort to effectively handle the methamphetamine problem and limit the effects on our community.”

Jan 08

Wilson County Sheriff’s Officers Find Meth Labs

Wilson County Sheriff’s Officers found and secured two methamphetamine lab cooking sites at a Wilson County business after receiving a tip from an employee at Roadrunner Transportation on January 6.

Upon arrival at the scene at 135 Maddox Drive, Deputies Sgt. Kyle Wright, Mike Warren, and Chris Brandenburg found two separate locations where methamphetamine had been cooked. The deputies secured the area and called methamphetamine lab technicians to quarantine the property in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation state laws.

Wilson County Sheriff’s Office Detective Jeremy Reich, a member of the Tennessee Methamphetamine & Pharmaceutical Task Force, was originally called to the scene. Detective Reich asked Mike Justice, Director of Lebanon Public Safety, for assistance. Director Justice then dispatched a clandestine lab team to assist with the proper retrieval and disposal of a hazardous materials and chemicals. Director Justice’s team and W.E.M.A. were instrumental in ensuring all precautions and safety requirements were taken to prevent further exposure as required by state law. The property remains under quarantine. Detective Reich is continuing the investigation and upon completion will present all evidence pertaining to this case to the Wilson County Grand Jury for potential indictments related to narcotics.

Wilson County Sheriff Robert Bryan has been extremely proactive in his approach to the ever-growing and dangerous occurrences relating to Methamphetamine. Sheriff Bryan has been instrumental in assisting with developing a joint Wilson County Methamphetamine Task Force and has recently assigned several members of the Sheriff’s Department to this team. This is a multi-agency team, which was recently formed, includes the Lebanon Police Department and WEMA,

“We are proud of this new task force and appreciate the collaboration all of our county agencies have provided to combat this growing problem,” Sheriff Bryan said. “The team was very effective and professional.”

Oct 28

Sheriff Bryan recognizes West Elementary

Post-WestElementaryWilson County Sheriff Robert Bryan congratulated West Elementary School for its overwhelming contributions to the Victim Awareness Month Toy Donation Drive to help children in traumatic events.

 When Francine Lustre with the Tennessee Department of Correction’s State Probation and Parole Department asked the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office to participate in the Toy Drive, the Sheriff’s Office placed a donation box in the main lobby and set up a poster asking for donations, then posted a photo on the Sheriff’s Office social media website. West Elementary School employees learned of the event through social media and began discussing with Wilson County Sheriff’s Office School Resource Officer Joseph Bowen the possibility of helping.

 West Elementary School Principal Becky Siever immediately agreed to the idea, and employees set up three donation baskets in addition to placing posters advertising the event throughout the school. As a result, students and employees donated many more toys for the drive.

 “The Sheriff’s Office is so thankful for West Elementary School students and employees for taking the initiative to offer so much help with such an important program,” said Sheriff Bryan. “West Elementary School is teaching its students a valuable lesson in helping others through the kindness of giving back to the community.”

 September was Victim Awareness Month. Each year, the Office provides a collection area for the State Department of Probation and Parole. All the toys collected will go to law enforcement and fire department agencies throughout Wilson County to give to young victims in traumatic situations such as a traffic accident, crime or fire.

WCSO Resource Officer Bowen said the school donated more than he expected after an employee sent notes to parents about the charitable efforts. “I was extremely proud of these students who gave up so much to help other children feel better.”

Jul 22

Red Cross Blood Drive

The Wilson County Sheriff’s Office will be participating in a blood drive.

When: Thursday, August 21st, 2014

At 105 East High Street, 2nd floor training room

Between 11:00 – 4:00

For online donor scheduling, go to www.redcrossblood.org and use sponsor code: WilsonCountySheriff

*** UPDATE!!!   As of 08/11/2014

100% participation has been reached. Thank you!

After speaking with the Red Cross representative she advised that the blood supply is at a Crisis low. Because of the great need for donations the blood drive will be open to walk-ins, those with an appointment will be taken first, walk-ins will be subject to waiting.

Wilson County Farm Days

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We want to thank the organizers of Farm Days for inviting the Sheriff’s Office! We got to meet many great Wilson County kids and got to answer many questions about the duties of the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office around the county.